LIST PROMOTIONS AS SEPARATE JOBS ON YOUR RESUME

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Uncle David has gotten every job he has ever gone for, so when he gives job-hunting advice, you better listen up. Join us every week for Uncle David’s 100% Successful Job Hunting Tip.

SHOW DATE: NOVEMBER 6, 2013

This one’s short and simple.

Promotions are the first thing the interviewer looks for on your resume. So when you’ve been promoted on the job, don’t make the mistake so many others make and hide it.

What most people do is, under the name of the company they’ve worked at, they put their latest title, then a comma and finally their prior title, as such: Senior Account Manager, Account Manager.

What you’re doing there is hiding your promotion. So instead of bunching these positions, list them as separate jobs, each complete with their own dates and bullet points.

PEOPLE DON’T HAVE TO WORK THE SAME WAY YOU DO

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SHOW DATE: NOVEMBER 6, 2013

Don’t make everyone work the way you work.

Just because you have a certain system of doing things on the job, it doesn’t mean others have to adhere to it.

For example, Auntie Evan is most creative when he’s pacing around his conference table—the physical movement helps him focus on whatever he’s working on. Uncle David is the traditional, “sit in your seat and don’t move” kind of guy when it comes to a project.

Be open to the possibility of letting people work the way they work and be the way they are. When you try to control your teammates, they get angry and they lose their respect for you.

You become that annoying guy nobody wants to work with because it always has to be your way. Nobody wants to work with the prison warden.

THE WAY YOU ARE AT HOME IS THE WAY YOU ACT ON THE JOB

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SHOW DATE: NOVEMBER 6, 2013

Chris Christie, a conservative in the very blue state of New Jersey, got re-elected last week with 60% of the vote.

Fascinating, considering the majority of New Jerseyans don’t see eye to eye on many of his basic issues. He doesn’t, for example, want to raise the minimum wage, and he doesn’t believe in same-sex marriage. So how did Christie get such a large slice of voters on his side?

It’s simple. Christie knows exactly who he is. There’s no bullshit demarcating him: he’s the same guy on the job, in the public eye, as he is at home. He takes his strengths and weaknesses and leverages them. What can we take away from this?

You are the same person on the job as you are at home. Whatever you do at home—the good, the bad and the ugly—you play out in the office.

The problem is you think you act differently on the job. There is some imaginary “professional mask” you wear at work that you think you take off at home.

Those mannerisms that drive your partner or friend crazy, you’re bringing that into the workplace whether you know it or not.

Let’s say you and your partner sit down and watch an hour of TV, and it takes two hours to get through a one hour show because you keep getting up to do stuff like get a snack, check your phone or computer, or brush your teeth, so you’re constantly pausing the DVR. Your thoughts are scattered and distracted. This is exactly what you take to work, and although you’re more limited in how you sidestep your tasks, you still do it on the job without even realizing it.

The first step to mitigating the problem is becoming aware of the causal factors.

How exactly do you parse out your Achilles heel(s)? Assess yourself. Ask yourself, what are a few things that drive my partner/roommate/friend crazy? What’s that complaint they always have about me? This is what you’re likely taking with you to the job. Better yet, ask them what they think your quirks are.

For example, it’s your turn to take out the trash, walk the dog or clean the dishes, and your response is always the same: “I’ll do it in a minute.” Guess what? At work, you’re likely putting everything off till the last minute, until your tasks accumulate to a point where disaster is imminent.

Here’s how to systematically assess your problems, hone in on them and shoot them down before they manifest into something job-threatening:

1) Grab hold of someone who sees you on daily basis, or has known you for years, and get them to spill the beans on what annoys them the most. They might enjoy it.

2) Take a breath—don’t be stubborn and fold your arms at their response; think about how this may affect your performance at work.

3) Lose the attitude and start observing yourself on the job—catch your quirks before you have a chance act them out.

You don’t always want to hear the truth about yourself. But this is what will get you ahead in your career. Listen to what people are saying. Lose the grand delusion of separate home and work personas. These only serve to distract you from the small, quickly dismissed foibles that affect your job performance. Once you’re honest with yourself, once you drop the bullshit, you’re going to be more liked, more respected and more likely to get promoted.

Job Talk Daily Live – Nov 6, 2013

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FOUR BIG SIGNS YOU’RE GETTING LAID OFF

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SHOW DATE: OCTOBER 30, 2013

There are four major signs that you’re going to get laid off. If you notice any of these at your job, dust off your resume and update your LinkedIn page: hunting season is approaching.

1) Big projects are put on hold with no explanation. If that project everyone’s been focusing on in the office is put on hold, it probably means something fishy is going on at the company, and the next step may be downsizing.

2) Your boss, who used to float around the office all the time, is now constantly behind closed doors.

3) You’ve always gotten good performance reviews, and now, all of a sudden, you’re not getting any or you’re actually getting a bad one. If you didn’t change the way you do your job, or you’ve been a top performer until now, management is likely starting a paper trail. They are establishing the groundwork so that when it comes time to lay you off, they’ll have evidence of your “declining” performance.

4)  If you’re asked to train a colleague, especially if it’s a colleague that’s not in your group and has nothing to do with your job, you’re probably training your replacement.

Be on the lookout for these four big signs. Just as some people are always “camera-ready,” you should be job-ready. Brush up on your interview skills and always have a resume on hand; you never know who you’re going to meet.

GAPS IN YOUR RESUME DON’T HAVE TO BE A BAD THING

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Uncle David has gotten every job he has ever gone for, so when he gives job-hunting advice, you better listen up. Join us every week for Uncle David’s 100% Successful Job Hunting Tip.

SHOW DATE: OCTOBER 23, 2013

Stop thinking the gaps in your resume are a bad thing.

Whether you’ve  recently been laid off or have been out on the prowl for months, what really matters to a new employer is not that you didn’t have a job, but what you did with your time while you were out of work.

Did you just sit around and watch Judge Judy all day long? That’s a problem—Judy’s going to cost you your next job.

So what do you do? Volunteer, go out, get active. Involve yourself with a nonprofit, or help homeless cats, or do what Auntie Evan did and start an organization that helps inner-city youth with their college essays.

Do anything, just don’t sit around and do nothing.

CHECKING FACEBOOK IN THE MORNING CAN KILL YOUR DAY

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SHOW DATE: OCTOBER 30, 2013

Like most of us, the first thing you do when you come into work is check your Facebook. Don’t groan, we’re not deriding you for it. We’ve adapted to the Facebook culture; in fact, Uncle David occasionally checks his Facebook eight times in a single day.

The problem is when you look at your Facebook in the morning, you start noticing minutia such as no one commenting on the photo you posted, or friends posting photos of their trip to Belize, and you start to feel depressed.

You want to be there with them, or you get wrapped up in what people said or didn’t say about your photos.

It’s a bad start to your day. We suggest waiting at least until lunchtime to check Facebook.

WHEN YOUR CO-WORKER BECOMES YOUR NIGHTMARE BOSS

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SHOW DATE: OCTOBER 30, 2013

They used to be so sweet and supportive; now they’re practically ruining your life.

You don’t even want to come into work anymore.

Is this a familiar tune? It should be, because all of us have had the experience: you help a co-worker you’re friends with get promoted, and they turn their back on you without acknowledging everything you did for them.

It hurts when you say all these great things to help your friend, and then BAM, they treat you like nobody just because they’re in a position of power. It’s a huge smack to the face, especially if they’re now your boss. The least they could do is invite you to meetings, or ask you for advice, or even just give you an explanation of why they’re sidelining you.

We emphasize a great deal. Auntie Evan is having this very same ordeal going down at an organization he works for, and Uncle David has helped someone get on a national television show who’s now making millions, but who hasn’t acknowledged him since.

Anger is not going to help you get that promotion. We get that you simply want to be respected for your deed, to be acknowledged for your help. But the angrier and more bitter you get, the less people want to be around you.

It can be emotionally draining (and sometimes even downright infuriating) to have someone you cared about suddenly make a 180 and become the biggest bitch this planet’s ever seen. The good news? You can confront them about it. The bad news? You have to confront them about it.

You have several choices, in fact. You can quit, not resolving anything; you can seethe with bitterness till you’re fired; or you can take the high road and talk to your former co-worker/ex-friend one-on-one.

To be clear, just because they’re acting like a flaccid douche bag doesn’t mean you should do the same. With that in mind, let’s move on to how to finally confront your friend-turned-nightmare-boss (the right way):

1) You’ve marginalized me: Sit down with them and say, “Listen, I feel like you’ve marginalized me. It’s hard to talk about this, and I feel awkward doing so, but I really feel like since you got your promotion, things haven’t been right between us.” The amazing thing is, after you tell them how you feel, they might be surprised at your sentiment; they might’ve thought they were acting fine. Or they might get right back up on their bitchiness pedestal. Either way, move on to step 2…

2) Treat me with respect: If you’re going to confront your new superior, don’t come empty handed. Give a legitimate example where you weren’t treated with respect… not a time when you felt unnoticed because your ego wasn’t in check.

3) Cool off, walk away: Don’t push it. you’re trying to mend the relationship, not prove to them that you’re right. If they’re not budging, back off and calm down. Focus your energy on your work.

In the end, this is about your ego. You feel betrayed, taken for granted and left in the dust. But you won’t know the situation till you confront your former co-worker and deal with the problem head on. Even if you don’t hear what you want, leave your ego at the doorstep and focus on the thing that will make you an amazing co-worker: being great at what you do.

YOUR GAY CO-WORKER HAS A RIGHT TO EARN A LIVING

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SHOW DATE: OCTOBER 23, 2013

You need to deal with the fact that your gay worker has a right to work in the same office.

This is coming up because a Republican polling organization has just found out that 68% of Americans support a federal job protection bill for gay people, including 56% of Republicans.

Which is great, but what we find most interesting about this is that if you change the wording and take out any mention of gay people, support goes up to 88%. In other words, if you ask somebody, “should a company fire somebody based solely on his or her performance,” 88% of people agree with that. Being gay, of course, is not part of your performance, so there is a noticeable 20% disparity in support when the wording is included.

If you’re one of these 32% of people who thinks it’s okay to fire somebody because they’re gay, we’ve got one simple piece of advice for you: get over it. The world is changing, and you’ve got to keep up with it or you’ll end up on the losing side.

The bottom line is, learn to deal with your co-workers or you won’t get very far in your career.

GOT A MESSY DESK? YOU’RE MORE LIKELY TO BE CREATIVE

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SHOW DATE: OCTOBER 23, 2013

The Harvard Business Review just came out with a fascinating study that compared those who keep their desks extra neat with those who stick to more haphazard means of organization.

Research showed that those who had papers scattered in organized piles on their table were five times more likely to have a creative idea than those that kept everything neat.

Apparently, a somewhat disorderly environment seems to aid creativity by helping people break out of tradition, order and convention.

Next time you decide to arrange your office supplies in alphabetic order, remember that a bit of chaos in your work area can help jump-start some creative thinking.