Interview responses?

Interview

SHOW DATE: September 6, 2012

If you need time to answer a question in an interview, tell them you need to think
about it. Don’t just sit there and stare into space. This is important because in that
moment you are managing expectations. It says, “I take charge, I’m not afraid.”

Don’t be an Over-Poster

url-6

SHOW DATE: July 25, 2012

Don’t be sending junk mail on Facebook while you’re at the office. What does that
mean? No one cares that they forgot your side of honey mustard at McDonald’s.
Or that, “we are low on yellow ink.” Or that Verizon just put up a tower in Calgary.
Simply put: NOBODY CARES. And two things start to happen. One, you look like you
don’t have enough work to do, two, people start to resent you for “slacking off” and
three, you are not concentrating on the work at hand.

Take time-off

url-7

SHOW DATE: June 27, 2012

You need to regenerate. That means—leave your cellphone. That’s right, take a
vacation. No one likes you more because you don’t take your vacation days. If you’re
rolling your eyes, because you work for yourself or you own the business then set
“check-in” times. And let your employer or staff know that is when they can reach
you, or when you will be returning emails. Otherwise there are no emergencies.
People have died for years while you were away. Taking this time off will help you
perform better after you return.

url-6

SHOW DATE: May 9, 2012

Before you head to a networking event or a job interview, come up with a 30-
second spiel. It’s a great way to introduce yourself at events and also to answer the
“tell me about yourself” interview question. Example: When introducing yourself,
instead of saying, “I’m a web designer,” try, “I am a techno shock therapist. I take
dead websites and I breathe new life into them, through e-marking, incorporating
integrating strategy you’re your overall marketing cap…etc.” End it with, “Tell
me about your current website.” Engage the person you are speaking to. You are
launching a conversation. This is who I am. This is what I do. Then by asking a
question at the end, you get the interviewer to talk about themselves. And then—
you are gold. Listen to Uncle David and Auntie Evan deliberate this below:

What not to wea

IMG_3357

SHOW DATE: April 25, 2012

On a job interview, don’t dress in a flashy or trendy way. Don’t over do it. If you
dress in a trendy way, they are not going be interested in you. But you found this
great pair of camouflage pants at a thrift store this weekend? Save ‘em for camping.
Whether it’s for a bank job, a start-up or a music manager—Air on the conservative
side. Listen to Uncle David and Auntie Evan debate this below:

On a job interview, asking for an opinion is always better than asking for facts

Interview

SHOW DATE: July 25, 2012

Think about it. Facts and data are names, places, numbers. For example, “How
long have you been working here?” “Six years.” An opinion-question requires a
judgment call. “What surprised you most when you started working here?” Don’t
ask your interviewer for data—it’s won’t lead to an interesting conversation or help
the employer remember you. Ask a question that demands an opinion like, “What
surprised you the most about this company?” “What’s your favorite thing about this
company?” The interviewer will become alive, and engaged, and friendly with you.
Listen to Uncle David and Auntie Evan deliberate this below:

If you want the job—lose weight and stop thinking that looks don’t matter

url

SHOW DATE: June 27, 2012

C’mon. Healthcare costs are rising for business, and—guess what—businesses pay
HALF of their employees healthcare. So you do the math. Would an employer rather
hire someone that appears in shape? Or out-of-shape? Look—no one is actually
gonna tell you this—because it’s not legal to discriminate. However, the appearance
of your overall general health WILL play a factor in terms of whether or not you get
hired. So save the cab fare and start walking to appointments. Strengthen that core
and eat your veggies. Listen to Uncle David and Auntie Evan examine this further
below:

Give your hobbies and extracurriculars a place on your resume

url

SHOW DATE: June 20, 2012
Let employers see what you initiate, what you create, what you’re up to. Don’t be
afraid to include that garage band you started, or your cribbage club. You don’t want
employers to think that in your spare time you’re eating Ben & Jerry’s and watching
Brandi and Arienne spar on Real Housewives of Beverly Hills. Listen to Uncle David
and Auntie Evan discuss this below: