STOP USING YOUR COMPANY EMAIL ON YOUR RESUME

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Uncle David has gotten every job he has ever gone for, so when he gives job-hunting advice, you better listen up. Join us every week for Uncle David’s 100% Successful Job Hunting Tip. 

SHOW DATE: JANUARY 8, 2013

When you’re looking for a job, you want to make sure you have a personal email address listed on your resume.

There are people who feel that using their company email address on their resume legitimizes them and proves that they have a job. But that’s not the way you prove your legitimacy. There’s references for that.

For one, your company might be filtering its email system for any mentions of “resume.” In most cases, you wouldn’t want your company to be privy of your job hunt.

It’s enough for your future employer to see, “ABC Inc. | XXXX – Present.” Like we said, you can always put a co-worker as a reference to legitimize your time there.

And if your personal email is comprised of something ridiculous like jess2hot4u@gmail.com or something, create a new email address, don’t use your company email.

 

 

 

WHEN YOUR BOSS FRIENDS YOU ON FACEBOOK

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SHOW DATE: DECEMBER 18, 2013

When your boss friends you on Facebook, it’s a dilemma for the ages. Anytime you friend a co-worker or your boss on Facebook, you’re taking on all their co-workers they’ve friended. It’s like an STD: the disease keep proliferating and now they most of the company has access to your racy photos.

So when your boss friends you on Facebook, or you want to friend a co-worker, just send them to LinkedIn. Facebook is for friends, LinkedIn is for the office. That’s exactly what you say: “I use LinkedIn for the office.”

PLANNING THE OFFICE HOLIDAY PARTY

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SHOW DATE: DECEMBER 11, 2013

If you’re planning the holiday party, here are a few valuable things to keep in mind:

  • Get everything set up days in advance. It’s going to be crazy those few hours before the party, so why add to that craziness? Leave only the finishing touches to the day before or the day of.
  • Your boss will probably go crazy. Don’t shut down as he’s turning red and machine-gunning spittle over your blank face: try and see what he’s actually upset about.
  • You want the day of the party to be about taking care of your boss and taking care of any fires, so once again, get everything set up days in advance.
  • Name tags are pretty detestable and cheesy… in principle. But unless it’s a small event where everybody at the party knows everybody else, just put the name tags on. You want people to mingle and get to know each other.
  • If you’re invited to anything—especially if it’s a business event or holiday party where the hosts are paying for the food and drinks—look into the calendar the moment you get the invitation, RSVP right away, put it in your calendar, set a reminder, and show up. If you’re the one setting up the party, keep reminding your guests that it’s happening. People have busy lives—they may forget.

IS YOUR NAME STOPPING EMPLOYERS FROM FINDING YOU?

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SHOW DATE: NOVEMBER 27, 2013

Don’t let your common name (ex. David Thomas) keep you invisible on social media.

Career Builder did a survey this year that found that 43% of hiring managers admit to researching high-ranking job candidates on LinkedIn and Facebook and other social media. And of course, having that common name makes you much harder to find.

There’s a simple solution. Make sure that when you register for a site like LinkedIn, the email address connected to the social media platform is the same email you have at the top of your resume.

A hiring manager can simply do a Google search on your email address and one of the first things to pop up will be your personal social media accounts. It’s a great way to stand out in the process.

STOP CLUTTERING YOUR RESUME

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Uncle David has gotten every job he has ever gone for, so when he gives job-hunting advice, you better listen up. Join us every week for Uncle David’s 100% Successful Job Hunting Tip.

SHOW DATE: NOVEMBER 27, 2013

Is your resume stuffed to the gills? Are your margins .2 inches on every side? Does your resume look like a wall of ink when you print it?

We know that one of worst things you can give to an employer is a thin resume. The second worst? A resume that shows no restraint and no editing.

Resumes are snapshots, not comprehensive documents—that’s what a CV is. CV’s can be five or six pages long, because they’re basically everything you’ve ever done.

As for your resume, if you’re under 35, you should stick to one page.

Here are the guidelines for your page margins:

  • A top margin of .5 inches
  • A bottom margin of no less than .3 inches
  • Keep those side margins to a full 3/4 of an inch.

If you find yourself going to the edge of the paper, show some restraint. Employers will respect you more for knowing how to cut the fat.

FIVE POSES YOU SHOULD NEVER ASSUME IN THE OFFICE

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SHOW DATE: NOVEMBER 13, 2013

Certain body language can make you look defensive and weak on the job.

We’ve read a nice article by Julie Bawden Davis on the American Express Open Forum site, and she gave five poses you should never assume in the office. Check them out:

1) Crossing your ankles while standing. Frankly, it’s much more comfortable in high heels to stand this way, but it makes you look flirty.

2) This one’s just too demure: when you stand with your hands clasped over your front, it looks too submissive.

3) Tipping or tilting your head while listening. It’s cute, but you’re not Fido; don’t tilt your head like a dog.

4) Eye contact while your head’s tilted down: that’s just way too flirty.

5) Any nervous habit: picking lint off your clothes, cleaning your fingernails or twirling your hair while someone’s talking to you. It just zaps all your credibility.

ONE CRUCIAL TIP TO HELP YOU GET MORE JOB OFFERS

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Uncle David has gotten every job he has ever gone for, so when he gives job-hunting advice, you better listen up. Join us every week for Uncle David’s 100% Successful Job Hunting Tip.

SHOW DATE: NOVEMBER 13, 2013

When you’re sending your resume out, save all that pretty formatting—the boxes, the graphs, the shading—for the resume you print out and physically hand to employers.

When you send your resume out to large companies, or even a medium-sized one, they have something called the Applicant Tracking System (ATS). This is how HR manages the thousands of resumes they get.

This tracking system reads the resumes electronically—and all those little boxes and shadows and fancy lettering stop the program from properly reading your resume. This is a big reason you haven’t been getting as many job offers as you should be. The system just can’t process the awesomeness of your resume.

So here’s what you do: have two versions of your resume. One to physically give to someone in an interview, or to mail out, or to attach as a PDF. But then you’ve got your ATS-friendly resume.

If you have to upload your resume to a system, make sure you attach a version stripped of all the fancy formatting.

TURN YOUR SEASONAL GIG INTO A FULL-TIME JOB

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SHOW DATE: NOVEMBER 6, 2013

You can turn that great seasonal job into full-time work with one simple piece of advice: take it on like a full-time job from day one.

It’s so simple that it’s brilliant.

Most employees come into these seasonal positions thinking, “I’m in, I’m out, all I got to do is get a paycheck, but I hope I can take this on full-time one day.” Stop this magical thinking and start being action-oriented.

It’s not going to happen to you unless you treat that seasonal job as if you were going to work there for years.