WHAT TO DO WHEN YOU FIND A CO-WORKER IN TEARS

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SHOW DATE: FEBRUARY 5, 2014

There’s that awkward moment that occurs in every office when you turn around and see your co-worker in tears.

What do you do? Do you follow up and ask what happened?

Instead of just ignoring what’s going on, take action and don’t let them sit there in pain. Ask them.

If you see it happening in your office, don’t let it float on the table—it just makes the situation worse.

If the person doesn’t want to talk about it, respect that. But by assuming that they don’t want to discuss it, you’re just creating a more awkward situation.

GAY MALE BOSSES GET MORE EMPLOYEE SATISFACTION

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SHOW DATE: JANUARY 22, 2014

The facts are in: gay male bosses produce 35 to 60 percent higher levels of employee engagement, satisfaction, and morale than straight bosses.

In his book The G Quotient: Why Gay Executives Are Excelling as Leaders . . . and What Every Manager Needs to Know, USC business-school professor Kirk Snyder argues that gay bosses employ a style of personalized attention that allows high-maintenance gen Xers and Yers to maximize their performance.

Snyder says, “Gay executives tend to look at how each individual brings unique abilities, and they see their job as figuring out how best to take advantage of those skills.”

Why? It stems from their maturation period: key leadership skills like emotional intelligence and flexibility are learned early on by navigating tough social situations like high school and family circles.

DON’T BE THE LONE WOLF AT WORK

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SHOW DATE: JANUARY 22, 2014

You’re glued to your monitor, typing and clicking away furiously at some intense work project you have to finish by tonight.

That doesn’t mean you can’t visit and say hi to your co-workers. You’re not aiming to look like the lone wolf who does all the heavy lifting at the office—you want to be the office leader, the one who works his ass off while having open communication with everyone around him.

And that doesn’t mean just emailing your boss and co-workers. Drop by their office. Amidst the huge load of work, it will make you look like the guy or gal in charge.

WAITING TABLES ON YOUR PATH TO SUCCESS

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SHOW DATE: JANUARY 29, 2014

The president discussed raising the minimum wage last week, and we’re all for that.

But do you know who makes even less than the minimum wage? Yup, waiters.

Waiters are exempt from the minimum wage law.

Here’s the flip side though. According to a recent article in the Wall Street Journal, waiters at high-end restaurants are pulling in six figures.

Ivy league graduates are starting their careers serving drinks and food orders at really hip places around the country. Columbia and Harvard graduates are working in places like Per Se in New York.

Our point? Everything you need to learn about professional success you can learn as a waiter.

You want to be successful, you have to wait tables at least once, because you learn the following four vital skills:

1) Multitasking

2) Establishing trust

3) Dealing with demanding people

4) Working on a deadline

When you’re a waiter, you need establish trust. You have to be the person who knows how to take care of someone, and makes the customer feel taken care of.

It’s dealing with demanding people, it’s working on a deadline.

Sound much like an office?

waiter-tray_fullMore accurately, sound much like the path to a successful career?

ADD HYPERLINKS TO YOUR RESUME

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Uncle David has gotten every job he has ever gone for, so when he gives job-hunting advice, you better listen up. Join us every week for Uncle David’s 100% Successful Job Hunting Tip. 

SHOW DATE: JANUARY 15, 2013

Your resume is the gateway to your future career. So it’s a bit jarring to find out that hiring managers only spend about 10 seconds looking over it.

Fortunately, we have a way to make hiring managers look over your resume for more than 10 seconds.

Engage hiring managers by adding hyperlinks to your resumes. The great thing is, most people view resumes on their computer, meaning they can click links in your resume.

So if you work for, say, SnowCorp, put in a link to SnowCorp’s website on your resume. Also make sure to attach a hyperlink for your LinkedIn profile to your name at the top of your resume.

GET YOUR CO-WORKER CONTACT INFO NOW

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SHOW DATE: JANUARY 15, 2013

If you wait till a co-worker leaves your company to share LinkedIn information, it just looks weird.

Get personal contact information now. This makes them a “friend” you can always stay in contact with.

If you wait till the person resigns or gets fired to ask them for recommendation or advice, it will look like you’re just using them. If you’d stayed in contact with them, maybe they wouldn’t “forget” to give you that recommendation.

Get their personal information NOW.

IT’S NOT TOO LATE TO SEND A HOLIDAY THANK YOU NOTE

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SHOW DATE: JANUARY 8, 2013

It’s not too late to send out thank you notes to boss and co-workers. If somebody gave you a gift at work, or they hosted a party, an email is not enough. Send out a thank you letter—even if it’s two or three weeks late. People who really want to stand out at work lick envelopes, not keyboards.

If you’ve already sent the email, follow it up with a card. Here’s the script:

Thank you so much for the gift/party. Here’s to a great new year!

That’s all you have to write. If you’d like, mention the gift that you received. It’s not that hard. You don’t even need any valedictions—no bests or loves or anything. Just your name.

STOP BEING A TRAGEDY JUNKIE ON THE JOB

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SHOW DATE: JANUARY 8, 2014

There’s been a lot of coverage of 13-year-old Jahi McMath, who was declared brain dead in December. The controversy arose when Jahi’s mother, Nailah Winkfield started a legal battle to keep Jahi’s breathing apparatus in operation even after she was declared legally dead.

Whether the family should keep her alive or not is not a topic for this article. We’re more focused on the extended family gathered around by Jahi and her parents in news reports. It’s been the same group of people for the past few weeks.

It’s admirable that they’re supporting her. But we can’t help but wonder what these family members do for a living that allows them all this time off. We’re also wondering the position their co-workers and supervisors are put it. Everybody’s going, “OK, we feel really bad for you,” but after some time this begins to shift. We all know this because we’ve experienced it before; the sick relative you have visit or the kid athlete you have to support during meets.

Eventually co-workers start asking, “Where is cousin McMath? Why isn’t he here? Why am I doing his job?” Everybody wants to be supportive, but eventually people stop cheering.

If in a few more weeks the extended family is still on TV, there’s not going to be just one angry, insensitive a-hole on the job—there’s going to be a group of resentful co-workers who are secretly hating that they have to pick up the slack.

The bosses of the extended family members hired them for a reason: to fill a gap in the company. When they’re not on the job, other employees must fill that gap.

At some point, support turns into resentment. They’re tired of you being sick all the time, they’re tired of you being at your son’s events every week. For a little while, they wanted to support you. But now they’re not even talking about it.

In the case of Jahi’s parents, we understand the need to be by her side. But there is another type of person out there, and some of you know who you are: the tragedy/family junkie.

Tragedy/family junkies are easy to spot. They’re the people who need to take a day off to grieve over a train derailment, or attend their kid’s track meet every time. These people are really good at making people feel guilty for not supporting them.

What you don’t realize when you fall into this mind frame is you’re accreting gradual resentment; co-workers will start to ask themselves why they can’t see their ill mother or their daughter’s game. The boss wants to avoid this collective attitude at all costs, and that means eventually firing you if things continue the way they’re going.

There are other ways to give back to people. It’s great to be supportive and attend your kid’s meets, but it’s just as great to be a role model by going to work and getting promoted. If you’re the guy who’s constantly leaving early, you’re not displaying yourself as an exemplar, but someone who lacks leadership qualities and work commitment.

When you do fall into a situation where you have to be there for someone, you can still check in on work. Sitting and staring at the individual is a martyr game: it doesn’t get you anywhere.

You can be present at the bedside while being present on the job with FaceTime or Skype or whatever. This goes for the inverse as well. The McMath extended family can be present at work and, at intervals, check in on Jahi.

Stop playing the tragedy/family junkie card on the job. Co-worker resentment will only be followed by a docked pay or, worse yet, the boot.

WHAT YOU CAN LEARN FROM THE OLD OFFICE LADY

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SHOW DATE: DECEMBER 18, 2013

You know that old lady at the office, the one you think is really annoying because she thinks she knows everything?

Well, she does know everything (well, at least more than you do). This is a great opportunity to learn.

If you’re young, you usually overlook the chance to learn from someone with much more life experience than you. We get that you don’t want them to tell you what to do, but if you do listen, what you learn will help you grow.

And for you older women: being a leader means learning to talk to the younger employees in a more loving, colloquial way. That means not being frustrated with them because they’re acting stubborn.

WHY GETTING YOUR BOSS A GIFT IS A BAD IDEA

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SHOW DATE: DECEMBER 11, 2013

It’s not appropriate to give your boss a gift. And it’s doubly inappropriate to take up a collection for it.

There are three vital reasons for this that Auntie Evan has been mulling over in his head:

a) Someone may not feel the same way you do about the boss.

b) Other people can’t afford it.

c) Either way, it’s putting your co-workers in the uncomfortable position of saying “no.”

You’re not making anyone feel better by getting your boss a gift, and you’re not scoring any points.